Y is for Year of Proof #AtoZChallenge

Welcome to the A to Z Challenge. This year I’m blogging about the Behind the Scenes for the Echoes Trilogy – a story a started writing about six years ago.

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Y’all. Today is the second last day of the A to Z Challenge, and also the second to last day of April. Say what??? That means I’ve got to skedaddle along with my day so I can work on finishing up my goals for the month.

The Year of Proof plays a rather important part in Echoes, but strangely enough I have absolutely no idea where it came from. In the first draft I think it literally just showed up on the page (with me typing of course), but with no previous mention in the plot, etc…. It made so. much. sense to me, that as soon as I had typed it out, I was like “Well duh! Of course this is what they should do.” In fact, it kinda made me wonder why countries in real life don’t do it? Or do they, and I just don’t know about it? (Of course, if anyone wants to grant me princess status in a country then I can help institute their very own Year of Proof into that society.)

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So, what exactly is the Year of Proof? It’s where the heir to the throne chooses any city in the entire country and moves there for a year along with her entourage to rule the city. This is to prove to the land of Kios that she’s ready to rule when the crown is placed on her head. If something happens to the current ruler before the Year of Proof has taken place, then the heir to the throne assumes rule in title only, and has a council who does the actual ruling until the heir has completed more training.

It’s a huge privilege and honor to have your city be chosen for the Year of Proof, and the honor is accompanied by a bunch of festivities, holidays, and people coming to meet the heir to the throne. It’s by far the biggest year in the heir to the throne’s life until they actually become the king or queen.

And there you have it folks. What are some potential benefits or problems you think would accompany the Year of Proof?

21 thoughts on “Y is for Year of Proof #AtoZChallenge

  1. Deb Atwood says:

    The Year of Proof seems like a really good training idea. The future leader really gets to know a community and the personalities and challenges of a particular town. Maybe our leaders should have a year of proof also.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lydia Howe says:

      Yay! I’m glad you agree. 🙂 It ends up playing a huge part in the story, so I guess I really need to study out all the ideas more. 🙂

      Like

  2. Emma says:

    Methinks it’s a very neat idea:) Would it cause problems when there has been a mayor over a city for a long time and then suddenly the heir is ruling for only a year? Or does the mayor have the final word over any decisions? Or maybe there is no mayor in the first place??:) Just curious:)

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  3. Emma says:

    Methinks it’s a very neat idea:) Would it cause problems when there has been a mayor over a city for a long time and then suddenly the heir is ruling for only a year? Or does the mayor have the final word over any decisions? Or maybe there is no mayor in the first place??:) Just curious:) 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lydia Howe says:

      Oh, that’s a really great idea to take note of. Thank you! I’ll have to figure out a way to go around that. I’m thinking probably no mayor, just like a man who is under the king, but I’ll have to figure it out….

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      • Emma says:

        You could figure out a way to get around it or add another plot twist:) Who said everyone on the Island of Outcasts appreciates Princess Rylie?? 😉 I don’t know the whole plot (bohoo😭), so I have no idea if that’s even possible. Have fun figuring it out though🙃

        Liked by 1 person

  4. blikachuka says:

    I’ve been reading some hillipa Gregory novels about the English monarchy (the tudors etc). It seems they would send their oldest son off to Wales when a young child (like 6 or 7) to start being a leader there, with the support of trusted advisors. Seems crazy to me to do it so young, but I supposed they often came to the throne young too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lydia Howe says:

      Oh yes, that does sound vaguely familiar to me. Goodness, I can’t even imagine doing that at SUCH a young age. Maybe I’ll look into the subject more… Thanks for sharing. 🙂

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    • Lydia Howe says:

      Yes indeed! I do think that you’d learn a lot about what works and what doesn’t. And thanks, I’m glad you think it’s a good idea. 😉

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  5. Claire says:

    That’s a really good idea – I could see that being useful if implemented in real life! Hopefully someone comes along to give you a crown and you can put it into action. =) Also, it’s neat that the idea just found its way into your draft…maybe it was in your subconscious all along!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lydia Howe says:

      Why thank you, thank you! I have yet to find someone willing to make me a princess, but that doesn’t mean I’ve given up. 😉 And yes, probably so about it being in my subconscious….

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lydia Howe says:

      Hmmm…. Since it’s a kingdom ruled by the king, her father is ultimately in charge of everything. But, she might use her power in a negative way if she’s mad at the king….

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