A New Favorite Historical Fiction Book? {The Number of Love by Roseanna M. White}

Y’all. This is the book that I nearly cried about when I found out I’d been chosen to be on the early review team. Yeah, I was that excited and that honored about it. Of course, back then I didn’t realize that I would be in the midst of moving and overwhelmed with a new job and life-ish happenings in the weeks leading up to the book’s release. But here we are! The book released yesterday and although I moved before the physical copy of the book arrived at my old address, I did download an e-copy of the book and landsakes, people!

I settled down with this book and some popcorn on Sunday afternoon and prepared to be delighted as I read. Why was I so excited? Because this book features Margot De Wilde as the main character. Readers were first introduced to this character in the middle book of the Shadows Over London trilogy, as the younger sister of one of the main characters. In that book, she intrigued me like crazy – as in I would say she’s probably in the top five of most intriguing characters I’ve ever read about. And, considering the thousands of characters that have been part of my reading experience, that says a lot.

Before I say more, here’s a bit about the book:

NUMBER

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Three years into the Great War, England’s greatest asset is their intelligence network—field agents risking their lives to gather information, and codebreakers able to crack every German telegram. Margot De Wilde thrives in the environment of the secretive Room 40, where she spends her days deciphering intercepted messages. But when her world is turned upside down by an unexpected loss, for the first time in her life numbers aren’t enough.

Drake Elton returns wounded from the field, followed by an enemy that just won’t give up. He’s smitten quickly by the too-intelligent Margot, but how to convince a girl who lives entirely in her mind that sometimes life’s answers lie in the heart?

Amidst biological warfare, encrypted letters, and a German spy who wants to destroy not just them, but others they love, Margot and Drake will have to work together to save them all from the very secrets that brought them together.

Also, you can take a quiz for the book (after you’ve read it, because #spoilers). I just took it and got 8/10 answers right. I really thought I’d get 100 because the book is so memorable, but one of the questions was guesswork, and the other was a bit tricky. 😉

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This book was gold. The writing, the characters, the plot, and the time period came together in a perfect, seamless, beautiful story that tugged my heart and made me want to keep reading for ages. In fact, although I read this book in two sittings if I hadn’t been hurrying to finish it for review I would have made it last even longer so I could savor the characters.

When I read this book the rest of the world faded away and I was so immersed in the story that it really felt like I was there…that the characters were my friends, that I’d time-traveled back to the early 1900s and England was right outside my door.

I can’t even begin to imagine how much work and research went into writing this book. The concepts were so far beyond me, yet without being confusing. That takes so much talent and time to pull off. Margot, the main character, is a codebreaker who works in Room 40 during WW1. I knew about codebreakers during WW2, but until I read this book I had no clue they existed during the Great War. (Which is why I mistakenly assumed that this book took place during WW2 when I first heard about it.)

Margot is a mathematical genius and thinks in numbers. She’s logical, scorns emotions, and is unlike any other character I’ve ever read. I seriously couldn’t get enough of her character and wish we had a whole trilogy solely from her perspective. The way she reacted to grief was my favorite scene in the whole book, simply because I can’t even fathom doing what she did, and it totally shocked me, but was so true to who she was as a person. Plus, it made me tear up, and books that make me cry are the best.

Drake was the second main character, and although I generally don’t like it when the main female and main male character both have chapters from their perspectives, Miss Roseanna pulled it off perfectly. I think this is because although there was romance in the book, that wasn’t the main plot and when we saw life from Drake’s perspective we were actually seeing espionage work, not just fluff. Seriously, his work was so cool and when I read in the endnote how much of it was taken from historical facts, I was pretty amazed. Also, Drake is just a wonderful character all around and he’s got a fantastic name, so what’s not to like?

And then we have the bad guy. Seriously, y’all don’t even know how much I dislike it when books have sections from the villain’s point of view. And yet, somehow Miss Roseanna makes it work. She gave us just enough time inside the villain’s head so that he became real and intriguing, yet without giving too much away or making me feel creeped out. I’m very impressed.

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When it comes to books, this is one of my favorites. As in, it’s so close to being five stars that I’m really not sure if I should rate it four or five stars? (And y’all know how rare five-star fiction books are for me.) My one issue is that I really didn’t agree with a lot of  Margot’s ideals. I understand how she was changing and growing, and yet the book felt a little more feministic than what I like.

Other than that though, this book was simply fantastic. I hope y’all read it and enjoy it as much as I did. If you’ve read the Shadow Over London series, or if you plan on reading this book you should totally let me know so we can gush about the stories together. 😉

Way to go, Miss Roseanna, on writing another winner! Please keep writing and thank you so much for the honor of having me be part of your review team!

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Roseanna M. White is a bestselling, Christy Award-nominated author who has long claimed that words are the air she breathes. When not writing fiction, she’s homeschooling her two kids, editing, designing book covers, and pretending her house will clean itself. Roseanna is the author of a slew of historical novels that span several continents and thousands of years. Spies and war and mayhem always seem to find their way into her books…to offset her real life, which is blessedly ordinary.

An Unexpected Bookish Meeting

Y’all, here it is! The last book I read for review while I was on vacation. (Whew, getting all these reviews written is fun, but kinda hard because I let them build up since I didn’t have my computer with me.)

Fun story before I get into the review: I was reading this book in Mexico where our family goes on vacation each year. We stay in a small fishing village that isn’t in a touristy area.

As I was reading I posted about the book on my Instagram Story (y’all can follow me here if you want, I often post reading updates). A friend commented and said that it looked like a book she’d enjoy reading.

Now, plot twist: It turns out this lady was on vacation with her husband and their four young children only about a half an hour away from where we were staying! Crazy, right? As it turns out, we invited them over for supper one night and I hurried to finish reading the book before they arrived so I could give it to her. It was fun to have that random bookish/friendish connection in a different country. And hey, I’m glad she commented on my story. 😉

FIRST OFF, SOME STATS:

Find the book on: Amazon and Goodreads
Pages: 208
Publisher: Moody Publishers
Release Date: April 2, 2019
Title: Homeschool Bravely
Nonfiction

1

ABOUT THE BOOK

Quiet the voices of “not good enough” and step courageously into guilt-free homeschooling

Many homeschool parents have a long-term relationship with self-doubt. “Did I make the right decision?” “Could someone else do this better?” “Am I robbing my kids of something by not sending them to ‘regular school’?”

What if there’s a better way?

Not a 3-step technique or a shiny, new curriculum, but a change in perspective that transforms the way you plan, teach, and homeschool?

Homeschool Bravely teaches you to see homeschooling as a calling, helps you overthrow the tyranny of impossible expectations, and guides you through the common bumps in the road, including how to:

  • juggle school and parenting with toddlers at home
  • teach a struggling learner
  • plan with the end in mind
  • accept your own limitations without feeling guilty
  • stay the course even in the face of criticism

Reclaim your hope, renew your purpose, and transform your homeschool. Because the truth is: God will use every part of your homeschool, even your fears, faults, and failures, to weave good plans for your kids.

WHY I CHOOSE THIS BOOK

Despite the fact that I’ve read a lot of parenting books, I’ve never read any homeschooling books. That seemed like a fact I should remedy, and this book caught my eye, partly because of the title, partly because the cover is black.

Disclaimer: I’m not a parent, I don’t think I have the answers to parenting, homeschooling, or raising kids. I simply enjoy studying the subject and seeing how I can (very, very loosely) apply the principles I learn to myself, kids in my life, and maybe in the far distant future my own kids. Plus, it’s pretty fun to learn when there’s no pressure. But, as always this review will, therefore, be quite subjective, but will hopefully provide a unique point-of-view compared to the reviews written by parents who actually know what they’re doing.

WHAT I THOUGHT ABOUT THIS BOOK

I found it surprisingly interesting. The author is a blogger and a lot of times a blogger-turned-book-author is a hit or miss for me when it comes to style – there’s no middle ground. This one was, thankfully, a total hit. Her writing style was engaging, her tone honest, encouraging, and at times funny, and her stories were ones I could relate to from the perspective of an adult who grew up being homeschooled.

The author used to be an elementary school teacher, which felt like it gave her added credentials while talking about homeschooling vs. public schooling.

There were some things in the book I didn’t fully agree with (more related to her views on various things, rather than what she actually did), but those things were minor enough that they didn’t take away from the book for me.

For me, the most interesting part of the book was when she gave different suggestions of things to do with kids. It’s so intriguing to hear about things little kids can do for fun that are actually educational as well.

CONCLUSION

If y’all are interested in this book, you should check out her website (The Unlikely Homeschool) or look her up on Instagram. I watched some of her Instagram stories as I was reading the book and that really helped her to feel more relatable and alive to me.

I generally don’t recommend parenting books as a non-parent on my blog (because that’s weird), and the same goes for homeschooling books. But, I did enjoy reading this book.

RATING

I’m giving Homeschool Bravely four out of five stars – Moody Publishers was very kind to send me a copy of this book so I could review it.

Whose Waves These Are

Y’all, hang on tight because we have a little bit of a rambly review below. This is generally what happens when I really do or really don’t like a book.

FIRST OFF, SOME STATS:

Find the book on: Amazon and Goodreads
Pages: 368
Publisher: Bethany House Publishers
Release Date: April 30, 2019
Title: Whose Waves These Are
Fiction

3

ABOUT THE BOOK

In the wake of WWII, a grieving fisherman submits a poem to a local newspaper: a rallying cry for hope, purpose . . . and rocks. Send me a rock for the person you lost, and I will build something life-giving. When the poem spreads farther than he ever intended, Robert Bliss’s humble words change the tide of a nation. Boxes of rocks inundate the tiny, coastal Maine town, and he sets his calloused hands to work, but the building halts when tragedy strikes.

Decades later, Annie Bliss is summoned back to Ansel-by-the-Sea when she learns her Great-Uncle Robert, the man who became her refuge during the hardest summer of her youth, is now the one in need of help. What she didn’t anticipate was finding a wall of heavy boxes hiding in his home. Long-ago memories of stone ruins on a nearby island trigger her curiosity, igniting a fire in her anthropologist soul to uncover answers.

She joins forces with the handsome and mysterious harbor postman, and all her hopes of mending the decades-old chasm in her family seem to point back to the ruins. But with Robert failing fast, her search for answers battles against time, a foe as relentless as the ever-crashing waves upon the sea.

WHY I CHOOSE THIS BOOK

Mostly the cover. And the title. The title sounds so intriguing. I also read the back cover blurb, but that wasn’t the tipping point for me.

WHAT I THOUGHT ABOUT THIS BOOK

Oh guys. This isn’t a review I’m looking forward to writing because I always feel so bad writing a negative review when I’ve received a book for free. Yet, honest reviews are my specialty, so here I am.

Let me start off by saying that there isn’t really anything wrong with the book. The content is clean, the editing is good, and the writing is lovely.

But.

It just wasn’t the book for me. And that’s sad, because after reading the first several chapters I was super excited. As in, it’s been a long time since I’ve started a book by a new author and felt so much promise. I was intrigued by the characters, delighted by the quirks, and drawn in by the lyrical tone of the writing.

But then the time hops started, and the writing style changed, and I fell into bookerly woes and didn’t even want to finish the story. The good news about all those things I just mentioned is they’re purely subjective. That means that there’s a good chance you will like the story.

For me, when a book begins going back and forth with time periods, it’s a total hit or miss for me. Meaning, I either really, really like it, or else I really don’t like it. And this book was one that I really didn’t like. I’m not even sure why it was. I liked each of the time periods, but when the switching began I lost interest in all of them.

One thing that I think is super cool in theory but didn’t actually like in reality, was that the tenses changed with the different time periods. One of the storylines was told in present tense, and the other was told in past tense. (Both third-person.) This is a brillant way to tell a story, but sadly, for me, present tense just messes with my brain and it’s hard and takes a super long time for me to get into a story. So, to be pulled back and forth meant I never really had time to immerse myself in present tense, which is probably the biggest reason as to why I didn’t like the book.

Also, when I re-read the back cover copy just now I was amazed by how long it takes in the book to find out what the rocks are for. I read the back cover copy before I requested the book, but then forgot what the book was about before I started reading. I’m not sure if the knowledge of what was going on would have made the book better for me, or been spoiler-y?

As for the plot itself… It felt kinda jumbled together. Not everything made sense to me and I was a bit confused by why the relationships were so messed up. I mean, it you find out in the book, but it just felt off. 

I read this as an e-book because I was on vacation, but in retrospect, if I would have realized sooner that it was a time hopping book I would have waited to read my physical copy of the book and probably would have enjoyed it more.

To end on a positive note, there were some things I really liked in the book: The small town feel, the way Ann communicated with her uncle (SO COOL and one of my favorite things I’ve read about in a loooonnnngggg time), Rob and Roy’s relationship with each other (sweetest thing ever), and a certain chapter near the end of the book involving watching the sunrise over the ocean.

CONCLUSION

Y’all will probably like the book. I certainly don’t not recommend it. It was clean and interesting. I do encourage y’all to get a physical copy instead of an e-copy if possible because this is one of those books that is better read while physically.

Also, the book has a 4.8 star rating on Amazon, with over 75 reviews, so that’s pretty great.

RATING

I’m giving Whose Waves These Are two out of five stars and am thankful for NetGalley giving me an e-copy so I could review it for y’all.

A Mom’s Guide to Lies Girls Believe

Y’all. This book is so amazing that I rearranged my schedule so I could read it before I left for vacation so I could get this review posted for you. If you’re a mom of a tween girl, then this book is one for you. If you’re not, then you can at least read my review and then buy a copy because you’re curious. 😉

FIRST OFF, SOME STATS:

Find the book on: Amazon and Goodreads
Pages: 240
Publisher: Moody Publishers
Release Date: February 5, 2019
Title: A Mom’s Guide to Lies Girls Believe
Nonfiction

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ABOUT THE BOOK

You can’t change the world, but you can prepare her for it.

Your daughter is facing challenges you never dealt with at her age! From skyrocketing anxiety rates to bullying on social media, the Enemy’s lies are everywhere. How do you help the girl you love walk in freedom?

Mom’s Guide to Lies Girls Believe, the companion book to Lies Girls Believe is your tool to come alongside your daughter in the fight against the lies the world is telling her. Based on in-depth research and focus groups led by Dannah Gresh, author of Secret Keeper Girl and Lies Young Women Believe (Coauthored with Nancy DeMoss Wolgemuth,) Lies Girls Believe teaches your daughter the Truth she will need to navigate the challenges she is facing. The Mom’s Guide provides research, cultural trends, and case studies about the problems tween girls face, but also offers encouragement and biblical insight to empower you to talk with your daughter about God’s truth.

Together, these books give you the tools you need to start important conversations at an age-appropriate pace. Topics include:

  • Lies about God
  • Lies about Friendship
  • Lies about the Future
  • Lies about Myself
  • Lies about Boys
WHY I CHOOSE THIS BOOK

I really don’t remember what made me choose to request this book for review, but I’m glad I did.

Disclaimer: I’m not a mom, therefore I’m not the target audience, so my thoughts are more subjective than the average reviewer.

WHAT I THOUGHT ABOUT THIS BOOK

I started this book on a Wednesday night, just after having a conversation with one of my tween friends at church. The conversation included her showing me her Instagram and breaking into a happy dance because her crush had voted on her story. It saddened me to see a girl – who should still be enjoying the simplicity of childhood – being wrapped up in the drama of social media.

Then I came home and began reading this book and cheered for it on nearly every single page. Y’all. This book is full of gold.

The book itself is bright, cheery, reminiscent of childhood, colorful, and interactive. It was late at night when I opened the pages, but it was so interesting I kept reading, and reading, and reading, even though I had only planned to read the first few pages. Two days later and I’ve finished the book.

This book is supposed to be read at the same time your daughter is reading Lies Girls Believe. In fact, this book includes a lot of the pages from the Lies Girls Believe, while giving the mom ideas of how to have good conversations with their daughters, as well as helping the mom see how she can model the various truths taught.

In addition to being full of truth, this book was also very interesting and kept me engaged as I read. It quoted the Bible a lot (in a different color and font which was pretty cool), added statistics, case study stories, and facts. If I had a tween daughter this is most definitely a book I’d want to go through with her.

There are twenty lies in the book, along with twenty truths to combat them. These lies/truths include a wide range of topics, from how to see God correctly, to body image, to bullying, to social media, to what it’s like to be a girl (exploring topics like periods, etc…). The book covers tons of territory in just over two hundred pages and I was very impressed.

CONCLUSION

Y’all. This book was truly fantastic. Tweens these days are bombarded by so many lies, and the best time to teach them truths is right now. I highly applaud the authors of this book, as well as the publishers to work at getting this important message out into the world.

RATING

I’m giving A Mom’s Guide to Lies Girls Believe five out of five stars – Moody Publishers was very kind to send me a copy of this book so I could review it.

A King’s Mercy

FIRST OFF, SOME STATS:

Find the book on: Amazon and Goodreads
Pages: 400
Publisher: WaterBrook
Release Date: June 4, 2019
Title: A King’s Mercy
Fiction

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ABOUT THE BOOK

When captured rebel Scotsman Alex MacKinnon is granted the king’s mercy–exile to the Colony of North Carolina–he’s indentured to Englishman Edmund Carey as a blacksmith. Against his will, Alex is drawn into the struggles of Carey’s slaves–and those of his stepdaughter, Joanna Carey. A mistress with a servant’s heart, Joanna is expected to wed her father’s overseer, Phineas Reeves, but finds herself drawn instead to the new blacksmith.

As their unlikely relationship deepens, successive tragedies strike the Careys. When blame falls unfairly upon Alex he flees to the distant mountains where he encounters Reverend Pauling, itinerate preacher and friend of the Careys, now a prisoner of the Cherokees. Haunted by his abandoning of Joanna, Alex tries to settle into life with the Cherokees, until circumstances thwart yet another attempt to forge his freedom and he’s faced with the choice that’s long hounded him: continue down his rebellious path or embrace the faith of a man like Pauling, whose freedom in Christ no man can steal. But the price of such mercy is total surrender, and perhaps Alex’s very life.

WHY I CHOOSE THIS BOOK

Solely because of the author.

In fact, I just now (as I’m writing this review) read the back cover for the first time. And goodness, may I say it gives way too many spoilers? Seriously, it’s giving away plot twists that don’t happen until probably three-fourths of the way through the book. I’m so glad I didn’t read the back cover before I read the book.

But back to the author. I read Many Sparrows several years ago and really liked it, although because of some content issues I only gave it three stars. Since then, I’ve been on the lookout for more of Miss Lori’s books because of her writing and the time period and settings she tackles.

WHAT I THOUGHT ABOUT THIS BOOK

This book had me up and down and all over the place. Instead of going with pros and cons, we’re going to go with the beginning, middle, and ending.

Beginning – Two Stars

Y’all. This part drove me nuts. It kept flashing back to a year before and showing how the main character got to where he was when the book started. It was hard for me to keep picking the book up to read more because I wished the author would have just given us one telling paragraph of backstory and moved on.

Middle – Four Stars 

When the time hopping stopped the book went from being meh to making me not want to put it down. There were several characters that drew me in and really made the book for me. Jemma, a young slave girl, was my favorite for sure and I liked the portions with her storyline the best. She’s such a feisty little dear and I wanted to gather her up in a huge hug. The way Alex (the main male character) responded to her was my favorite thing about Alex for sure.

The middle of the book also contained several plot twists (that is, if you didn’t read the back cover) that propelled the book into a direction I hadn’t imagined. At one point in time I thought the author might do something totally risky with her characters and make it go in a direction no one would suspect, but alas, she didn’t.

Ending – Two/three Stars 

At about the 85% mark, we reached the point where I could predict the rest of the book and I was right, so that was a bit disappointing to me. There was also more violence/disturbing things in the last few chapters of the book. The author did a great job of making everything appear dark and bleak, and although I see why she did it, it wasn’t something I liked. Because of that, the book lost the four-star rating I had been planning on in the middle of the story, and I decided to go with three stars.

CONCLUSION

The book does contain violence and alludes (strongly) to some bad things that the “villain” does, but it never goes into detail. There’s a lot of revenge that takes place, ill-treatment of slaves, and other things that I won’t mention for the sake of spoilers.

On the bright side, the book gives a nod to a certain book of the Bible, and it was cool seeing the comparisons. 😉

It was also cool learning about the history behind the title of the book. Y’all should look it up.

RATING

I’m giving A King’s Mercy three out of five stars – NetGalley graciously provided an e-copy of this book for me so I could review it.

Books I’m Taking on Vacation

Y’all! Our internet has been down at our house for the last two days, so I’m currently sitting up at my brother’s empty house (cause they’re on vacation) writing this post.

Today I’m talking about the books that I’ll be taking on vacation. I’d be delighted to hear about how much reading you generally do on vacation, and what format of books you nromally take.

Across the Blue by Carrie Turansky (Fiction)
This is an ebook from NetGalley. I requested it a while ago but then didn’t get around to reading it yet. The book takes place in 1909, the main girl is rich, there’s something to do with a newspaper, and that’s basically all I know. (Hey, I like going into my books blind.) I’ve wanted to try this author for a while now, and vacation seemed like the perfect time to give it a go.

Harvest of Gold by Tessa Afshar
I bought this book around the beginning of the year, yet am currently listening to it as an audiobook from Overdrive. (Which is how I plan to take it.) Although Tessa Afshar’s writing is a favorite of mine, the two books in this series have not been making my happy list. So many bad things happen that it’s exceedingly frustrating to listen to, yet I can’t give up on the characters now.

Whose Waves These Are by Amanda Dykes
Bethany House Publishers sent me a copy of this book for review, and I lent it to a friend to see if she wanted to try a stab at reviewing it for my blog. She decided she’d rather not review it, but it won’t work out for me to get the book back from her before we leave for Mexico, so I downloaded the e-book from NetGalley which actually works pretty well for me since I’m packing light.

Homeschool Bravely by Jamie Erickson (Nonfiction)
This is a book I received from Moody Publishers to review. It was released last month and already has 76 reviews on Amazon with a 4.9 out of 5 star average. That sounds pretty impressive to me. I’m looking forward to this book because, although I was homeschooled, I’ve never read a book about homeschooling.

Holy Noticing by Charles Stone (Nonfiction)
Another book from Moody Publishers. This one interests me because it sounds like it’s going to talk about how our brains work and why we naturally do certain things. As long as it’s in layman terms, I find books like this to be utterly fascinating.

A Song Unheard by Roseanna M. White
This is the only re-read I currently plan on taking with me. It was the first book I read in the Shadows Over London series (no, I didn’t read the middle book first on purpose), and since I thoroughly enjoyed the rest of the series, I want to give this one a re-read, especially since…

The Number of Love by Roseanna M. White
I have The Number of Love to review! Y’all, I’m so excited about this! It’s the book I’m most looking forward to this year and I’m so thankful to have a physical copy of the book heading my way. I actually want to wait until the physical copy of the book comes in, but I also have access to the e-version of the book and since I will be on vacation, I might cave and read it while I’m gone.

And, in case any of y’all don’t know the connection, The Number of Love is about Margot De Wilde, who was one of the characters in A Song Unheard, which is the middle book in the Shadows Over London triology that takes place during WW1. The Number of Love (Margot is a mathematical genius) is the first in The Codebreakers series and takes place during WW2. I’m so, so excited about reading it.

In addition to these books, I’ll also be taking along a Hardy Boys book and a Nancy Drew book for my little brother who’s already on vacation. I doubt I’ll have room to lug any more physical copies of books along, but maybe they’ll fit in. 😉

*****

How many books do you generally read on vacation?
I’ll be gone for twelve days and seriously have no clue how much reading I’ll be doing. I generally fly through books on vacation, but ya never know…

4 Scenarios for Subjective Ratings

The more books I read in the more diverse settings and in the more various frames of mind, the more I realize that how I read and how I feel about what I read is quite subjective.

Here are a few examples:

1. The Red Herring Game 

For instance, recently I read a mystery book that was by a new author to me (review coming tomorrow). I’ve been reading/listening to quite a few mystery books recently, but they’re all written by a select few authors, and although I enjoy them I also have the mystery figured out pretty early on. So, to read a book where I didn’t know the author’s style and was surprised at the outcome made me rate the book four stars.

Since rating that book I’ve pondered it quite a bit and nothing really sticks out to me as to why it got such a high (for me) rating. The only reasonable explanation I have is that it surprised me, so I was pretty happy with it.

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2. The Hallmark Scenario  

The same thing happens when I’ve been sick for a while and therefore indulging in Hallmark movies. Y’all, those things are lame. I can say this without malice because I’m sucked into the lameness as well and watch them happily when I’m not feeling well. But they drive me nuts. And then I read a book that has some of the same components of a Hallmark movie, but then they go on and have a good plotline instead of a lame one, and I’m instantly cheering the book on – like, way to go not being a Hallmark movie! Yet in reality, if I would have read that book at a time when I was far removed from Hallmark movies, then I probably wouldn’t have actually thought the book was anything special.

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3. The Mindless Cheese Antidote   

Next, imagine you’re exhausted. You’ve got a cold, you’ve had a busy week at work, and all you want to do is snuggle in your blankets and do something mindless. So, you find the cheesiest book possible on Overdrive. And start reading.

It’s so silly you keep reading just so you can roll your eyes at it.

This happened to me last night. For nearly two hours I powered my way (aka skim-read) through half of a book by an author who I once had to read for review and felt horrible about because her books are so not my style. Last night the cheese was the perfect antidote for how I was feeling. And, as an extra bonus, I had no problem closing the book when I was tired enough to sleep, plus I have no desire to finish the story so I won’t have to publically rate it. It’s basically a win-win for everyone.

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4. We’ve Talked About This Saga

There are many books that I’ve picked up, found exceedingly uninteresting, and set back down. Skip a few months or years and you pick up one of those boring books, only to discover it’s one that you’ve recently seen an interesting review for, or it covers a topic that you’ve been chatting about at work, or it includes a historical person who you’ve been interested in studying. Suddenly that boring book is now top of your TBR pile and you can’t wait to get your hands on it.

Currently
Setting: Dancing on the treadmill
Listening to: Tightrope 

Question of the Day: Have you ever experienced one of these scenarios?