Rare Leadership By Marcus Warner/Jim Wilder – Book Review

Rare Leadership

By Marcus Warner/Jim Wilder

Find it on: 

First Person  

Non-Fiction

202 Pages

About the Book (Back cover Blurb):

Revive your leadership. Grow healthy teams. See great results. 

Healthy teams begin with healthy leaders, and at the heart of this dynamic is emotional maturity—the quality the greatest leaders possess. 

Combining solid theology, cutting-edge brain science, and decades of counseling and consulting experience, Rare Leadership shows you how to take your leadership and team to the next level. It will equip you to:

Cultivate emotional maturity in yourself and others

Develop the four habits of R.A.R.E. leaders

Promote a strong group identity

Keep relationships bigger than problems

Increase productivity through trust, joy, and engagement

Whether you are burnt out or just looking to improve, when you prioritize people and lead from a secure identity, you’ll be amazed at the freedom you feel and the results you see. You can lead from a healthy place, respond rather than react, and build the team of your dreams.

If you want to take your organization to the next level, it starts with you. Read Rare Leadership and be equipped to lead joy-filled, emotionally mature, relationally connected teams. 

Why I Choose this Book: 

Leadership is an important quality to have, so I thought reading a book about it would be helpful. 

What I Thought About this Book:

Unfortunately it wasn’t my cup of tea. There were lots of good “nuggets” of wisdom all throughout the book, but sadly the nuggets were interspersed with a lot of information that I had a hard time following. 

It was confusing trying to keep everything in order that they were teaching us about our brain and how brains work. There were also times when it felt like they were using their own “inside language” like when people who grew up in church have conversations with Biblical lingo that make outsiders go “What?” Yes, the book did give definitions and explanations, but there were so many of them that they got confusing. 

Overall I *did* learn stuff, and it was intriguing to learn how the brain works. I appreciated how they used the Bible to back up what they were saying, and constantly returned to that authority. The biggest take away I got from the book is how easy it is to fall into the trap of motivating people by fear when in reality it should be joy that’s our motivator. (Which makes sense when you think about verses like “The joy of the Lord is our strength.” 

Conclusion:

I’m not even sure how much I did or didn’t agree with this book, because I was confused for about half of it. Considering that 80 % of the reviews on Amazon are five-star reviews, I’m going to guess that most people really liked this book, so there’s a good chance y’all will, too. 

Rating:

I’m giving Rare Leadership 3 stars out of 5, and 5 stars out of 10. 

*I received this book free from Moody Publishers in exchange for an honest review*

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