Screens and Teens By Kathy Koch: Book Review

Screens and Teens
By Kathy Koch 
Find it on: 
First-Person 
Non-Fiction
256 Pages

Why I Choose this Book: 
I use technology (and, in this review when I say technology I mean things like smart phones and computers) a lot and think it’s a wonderful tool, yet it freaks me out how prevalent it is in society today and how so many people are seemingly controlled by their electronics. I want to make sure I’m a good steward of the techie stuff in my life and stay balanced. Books like “Screens and Teens” help me gain perspective and insight and show me places where I’m being excessive with my use of screens. 
What I Thought About this Book:
I highly recommend it. The author gives a very balanced and insightful look into the benefits and trouble that can go along with technology. She explains the lies that most kids/teens in first-world countries believe and then explains how technology has helped reinforce these lies and how parents can guard against that and instead use technology to help their teens grow. (Some examples of lies are “I deserve to be happy all the time” and “I must have choices.”) 
The author also explains how proper usage and perspective regarding technology needs to start with the parents which I totally agree with. (Although, that’s not an excuse for any teen who happens to read the book.) Even though I’m not a parent, and so therefore not who the book was written for, I find myself being so focused on getting as much work done as possible on my phone and computer that I miss out on the rest of life. This book helped remind me to cut back where needed to be balanced. 

Yesterday I was reading this book while sitting in the waiting room at the dentist. A guy came in with his son who was probably six years old. The boy was chattering excitedly and the man answered and made absent-minded noises as he scrolled through Facebook. (I could see because he was sitting right by me. Don’t worry, I wasn’t being creepy.) It made me really sad to see the boy neglected like that, and even more sad to realize that this is becoming the new norm. I know I’ve been guilty of focusing on my screen when I should be focusing on people, and that’s something I work on constantly.
Another issue they talked about was how a lot of kids are being raised today by technology. I’ve seen this to be so true and it scares me. A lot of times when a parent wants peace and quiet or wants to focus on their own thing or get some work done, they simply plop their kid down in front of a screen or hand them a phone and let the screens entertain them. This creates a whole host of issues that the child will have to work through the rest of their lives. The book brought to light some very insightful things that I hadn’t known before. 
Conclusion: 
This book is so well-rounded and very, very important. It also reminds me of another book I reviewed (which this book referenced quite a few times): “Growing Up Social” by Gary D Chapman and Arlene Pellicane http://aidylewoh.blogspot.com/2015/02… 
Rating: 
I’m giving “Screens and Teens” Four Stars (Nine out of Ten) and recommend to to adults and older teens (parents and non-parents alike). 

*I received this book for free from Moody Publishers in exchange for an honest review*

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